Tag Archive for ‘The Wall Street Journal’

Laptop Webcams Are All Pretty Bad ➝

I don’t expect the video quality on my MacBook’s webcam to match that of the iPhone 11 Pro, especially since the majority of the time it’s going to be compressed by a video conferencing app and sent over the web. But I sure hope Apple is listening on this — the camera component should be a lot better than it is.

➝ Source: wsj.com

How Jony Ive Masterminded Apple’s New Headquarters ➝

If you’ve been searching for a way to bypass the Wall Street Journal’s paywall to read Christina Passariello’s recent piece on Apple Park and Jony Ive, the full article is available on Apple News. Of course, that means you’ll have to read it on an iOS device, since Apple hasn’t released a News app for macOS yet.

Update: Nick Heer found another way to bypass the paywall — the full article is displayed when visiting the page from this t.co link.

Lightning Everything

It’s safe to say that I was a bit concerned when the Wall Street Journal published a piece that indicated Apple would be removing the Lightning connector from future iPhones and replacing it with a USB-C port. Don’t get me wrong, I love the idea of an open standard for charging — having a single cable that will work on Android phones, iPhones, MacBooks and potentially iPads would take a huge step towards simplifying the charging process for everyone.

My concerns were primarily selfish in nature, though. Just a few weeks ago I started the process of transitioning everything in my travel bag to replacements that charge over Lightning. The primary goal was to reduce the amount of cables I needed to bring with me and eliminate the frustration associated with finding the right cable for each device when I’m riffling through my bag.

Imagine my surprise when I read that Ming-Chi Kuo had clarified the rumor, saying that future iPhones would retain the Lightning connector, but that it would gain USB-C capabilities — much like the 12.9-inch iPad Pro, which supports USB 3.0 transfer speeds and faster charging when used with a Lightning to USB-C cable. This was great news. I could continue transitioning to Lightning everything without the worry of reverting my bag to a mess of cables when I purchase the next iPhone this fall.

You may be wondering what I could possibly have in my bag that allows me to go all-in on Lightning. There certainly must be something that requires, at least, a micro-USB cable. Well, no, everything in my bag has a Lightning connector.

My bag contains my entire everyday computing setup. I’ve been able to pare it back considerably since I’ve switched to iOS, but I’m still able to get everything done on these devices without ever needing to interact with a non-Lightning power cable. I specify “power” because I still have to carry an HDMI cable with me for the times when I want to watch video content on our hotel room’s television.

The first, and most obvious item in my bag is the iPad Air 2. It’s my primary computing device and where I do the vast majority of my work. It’s powered over Lightning, like the iPhone in my pocket, and every other iOS device Apple makes. And will make for the foreseeable future, thankfully.

Next, we have the Magic Keyboard and the Aukey 3600mAh Portable Power Bank. The Magic Keyboard isn’t anything particularly special. I’ve only had it for a few weeks and I’ve been lukewarm on it so far. The slim design and Lightning charging port are fantastic, but I still find myself getting a little lost in areas of the keyboard — especially the arrow keys. I haven’t found the shallow key travel to be as irritating as I was worried it would be. The pleasant clicking sound of the butterfly mechanism more than makes up for their lack of travel.

The Aukey Power Bank is a unique product, though. It’s the only external battery I’m aware of that charges over Lightning. It doesn’t appear to feature MFi certification, so my impression is that Aukey made it without Apple’s blessing. That would explain why no one else is making portable batteries with Lightning ports. But this is a tremendous product. It isn’t going to give you multiple-days-worth of charge for your iPhone or iPad, but its small enough to fit in your bag without adding much weight and the convenience of the Lightning port is unparalleled.

For trips when I expect to have a fair amount of downtime (which is rare) I have the SteelSeries Nimbus. It is, what I’d consider to be, the absolute best MFi controller available. I can prop up my iPad in the Twelve South Compass or plug it into whatever television is available, with the Lightning to HDMI adapter, and play some of the best games that iOS has to offer. And when I’m finished gaming, I can recharge the controller using the same cable I used with my iPhone.

The Future

There are two more Lightning-powered items that I’d like to add to my kit — AirPods and the Beats Pill+ (or a similar, Lightning-powered Bluetooth speaker). I’ve already ordered the AirPods, but Apple’s having serious supply issues and the estimated ship date isn’t for another five weeks. I’m hoping, by some miracle, that Apple will get them to me sooner than that. I’m growing tired of fighting with wires and I’d like to take them with me on a weekend trip in early April.

Everything I’ve read about AirPods have been positive overall and I imagine my experience with them will be no different. I’m ready for this courageous, new wireless world and a pair of Bluetooth headphones that charge over Lightning and are built on the W1 chip seem like the absolute best way to go.

I wish Apple offered a similar solution in the Bluetooth speaker market. The closest device available is the Beats Pill+, which charges over Lightning but isn’t built on the W1 chip. It’s a nice speaker, by most accounts, but I would hate to spend over $200 on a speaker that could be replaced by something significantly better sometime this year.

Luckily, I don’t find myself wanting a Bluetooth speaker too often. I think I’ll be able to hold out until later this fall to find out if Apple releases one with the W1 chip. If not, I’ll probably end up with the Beats Pill+, if only because its powered over Lightning.

To recap, here are the Lightning-powered devices that I currently have at my disposal, or plan to have in the near future:

As I said, that’s my entire, everyday carry computing setup. I do have a Mac mini at home that I occasionally use for tasks that require a Mac, but those are few and far between. And of course, I always interact with the Mac mini over VNC using Screens on the iPad — I almost never need direct access to the machine, I can do it all remotely, wherever I am.

I couldn’t have been happier to hear that Apple isn’t going to leave Lightning behind anytime soon. With everything in my bag being powered by the same cables, I can reduce clutter and limit the total number of cables required to power all of my devices. For the foreseeable future, I don’t expect to need more than two Lightning cables and a single, two-port charger when I travel. And that is something to get excited about.

Apple May Replace Lightning Connector With USB-C in iPhone 8 ➝

Benjamin Mayo, writing for 9 to 5 Mac:

The Wall Street Journal has outlined their current thinking on the next new iPhone from Apple, colloquially dubbed the iPhone 8. They believe that Apple will replace the Lightning connector on the bottom of the phone with a USB-C port, ditching its own propriety connector with an industry standard.

I hope this rumor is inaccurate. In an effort to simplify my travel setup, I recently started transitioning all of my portable accessories — external battery, wireless keyboard, and headphones — to models that charge over Lightning. Only needing to pack one type of cable is a big deal and I’d like to keep it that way for more than six months.

At the very least, I’d prefer Apple move to USB-C in only the rumored iPhone Pro and iPhone 7s Plus models, rather than the entire line. This would give me an additional two years with a single type of cable in my bag.

I’m all for moving to a more open standard, but I think it would be a mistake transitioning so soon after they doubled down on Lightning as the only connector on the iPhone 7.

Apple Slashes USB-C Dongle Pricing Following MacBook Pro Backlash ➝

Joanna Stern, reporting for the Wall Street Journal:

Apple Inc. announced Friday it will significantly cut the prices of the USB-C adapters it sells in its stores, following backlash to the lack of full-size USB, SD card or HDMI ports in the new line of MacBook Pro laptops. […]

Among the price cuts, the much needed $19 USB-C to USB adapter will now cost $9. The $69 USB-C Digital AV Multiport Adapter drops to $49. And a 1-meter USB-C to Lightning cable—the only direct way to connect an iPhone to a new MacBook—drops from $25 to $19, the same price as a standard USB to Lightning cable.

Remember when Apple dropped the original iPhone’s price by $200 just a couple months after release? That was weird.

Google AMP Gets Mixed Reviews From Publishers ➝

Jack Marshall, writing for the Wall Street Journal:

In recent months Google has begun including many more links to stripped-down AMP pages in its mobile search results. This has directed more traffic to those AMP pages and less to publishers’ full mobile websites. Google said in a Sept. 21 blog post that AMP search results would be introduced across search engine results pages worldwide “in the coming weeks.”

For some publishers that is a problem, since their AMP pages do not currently generate advertising revenue at the same rate as their full mobile sites. Multiple publishers said an AMP pageview currently generates around half as much revenue as a pageview on their full mobile websites.

Here’s a novel idea, stop using AMP entirely and build leaner web pages.

iPhone 7 to Ditch 16GB Storage Option in Favor of 32GB ➝

Chance Miller, writing for 9 to 5 Mac:

Following several sketchy reports, The Wall Street Journal is now reporting that the iPhone 7 will indeed ditch the 16GB tier. For the first time ever, the base iPhone model will come in at 32GB.

It’s about damn time.

Apple in Talks to Acquire Tidal Music Service ➝

I can’t imagine this being about anything other than Tidal’s exclusives. I don’t know much about the service — I’ve never used it myself — but I haven’t come across too many glowing reviews of it.