Facebook, Google, and a ‘Contract for the Web’ ➝

Matthew Butterick:

So it’s flabbergasting to now see Berners-Lee in the New York Times sidestepping any accountability, and instead promoting himself as the restorer of the web’s virtue. Berners-Lee is pushing what he calls the Contract for the Web, which he describes, with no irony, as a “global plan of action … to make sure our online world is safe, empowering and genuinely for everyone.” He assures us that “the tech giants Google, Facebook, [and] Microsoft” are all “committing to action.” What a relief! Berners-Lee still seems to think Big Tech can do no wrong, even at a time when public and political opinion are going the opposite direction.

I don’t think I’m nearly as negative as Matthew, but I do find it ironic that this “Contract for the Web” is being supported by Google and Facebook.

Google is the primary driving force behind a project which essentially created a dumbed-down version of HTML, that thousands of websites have been functionally forced to implement in order to maintain reasonable rankings in search results. But many of these AMP sites are nearly indistinguishable from one-another and the improved page load times that AMP promises could just as easily been obtained by building a fast non-AMP website to begin with.

And then there’s Facebook, which has built one of the largest walled gardens the internet has ever seen.

It sort of discredits the whole endeavor, if you ask me.

(Via Nick Heer.)

➝ Source: tinyletter.com

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