ArsTechnica Reviews the Google OnHub ➝

Ron Amadeo, regarding the OnHub’s smartphone app:

If you’re going to leave a comment with the question “Can it do x?” the answer is probably “no.” You can pick the name, password, static IPs, enable UPnP, do port forwarding, and really nothing else. You won’t be installing DD-WRT or doing anything advanced anytime soon—it’s a simple router.

And, as for the OnHub’s Wi-Fi speed when compared to a similarly priced router from Asus:

We also tried a speed test on a Nexus 6 in the yard about 100ft away from the router. Again, the OnHub lost. The Asus router handily beat the OnHub no matter where we were testing, with both increased range and better throughput (and that’s with being bridged to the OnHub, which probably gave the OnHub a small advantage). If you’re looking to spend $200 on just a router, there are better deals out there.

So, it doesn’t pack many features and isn’t even faster than other routers on the market. Why would anyone buy this? Because it’s likely a trojan horse for Google’s smart home initiative.

Personally, I wouldn’t suggest anyone buy the OnHub today. The idea of a smart home is too far off for the majority of people. And I think most would be better off spending the next few years with a great, feature-packed router than spend $200 on one that’s designed for what your home might eventually become.

Ron’s concludes with similar sentiments:

Right now, the router doesn’t seem like anything special. It’s perfectly functional but not much else. No one should buy the OnHub as purely a Wi-Fi router. What will make or break this device is the upcoming smart home functionality, and right now we just don’t know what that entails.

If you’re currently in the market for a router, I’d suggest the TP-Link Archer C7 or Apple’s Time Capsule.

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