Tag Archive for ‘Streaming Video’

Silicon Dust Quietly Introduces HDHomeRun Premium ➝

Phil Nickinson, writing for Cordcutters:

SiliconDust, the parent company of HDHomerun, on Aug. 18 announced HDHomerun Premium — 45 streaming channels for $34.99 a month. No contracts, and no cancellation fees, and it all works right inside the same HDHomerun application.

The service is be available on all HDHomerun Connect and HDHomerun Extend devices — specifically, models HDHR4-2US, HDHR5-2US, HDHR5-4US, and HDTC-2US. It’s available now (pending a firmware update to version 20180802 or newer) in the United States, and “coming soon” to Canada. Software-wise, the premium service works on Mac OS, Windows 10, Android and android TV, and iOS.

This is a neat new feature, especially since they were able to release it on existing hardware and get it working with third-party software as well. I use the Channels app on Apple TV and was able to preview all of the channels available with the premium subscription by turning them on in the app’s settings.

I doubt I’ll end up subscribing because my current setup gives me all the entertainment options I need, but I’ll keep it in mind if I’m ever in the market.

Disney to End Netflix Deal and Launch Its Own Streaming Services ➝

Todd Spangler, reporting for Variety:

Disney is ending its distribution agreement with Netflix for new movie releases, while it’s also buying majority ownership of BAMTech — the streaming-video company founded by Major League Baseball — in a $1.58 billion deal.

The moves set a clear course for the media giant to launch Netflix-style direct-to-consumer internet services from ESPN and Disney. Disney said will end its distribution agreement with Netflix for subscription streaming of new movie releases, beginning with the 2019 theatrical slate.

I’m certain Netflix customers aren’t happy about the service losing a major content provider, but I think this is the right move for Disney. They own the rights to a massive library filled with high quality video content — they’d be foolish for not building their own streaming service. It’s kind of amazing that they hadn’t built one already.

(Via Nick Heer.)

On the Possibility of Apple Buying Netflix ➝

John Gruber:

I’m not saying it could never happen or would certainly be a bad idea, but Apple’s services are built to take advantage of its hardware. Netflix is the opposite — it’s a service designed to be available on any device with a screen. With iTunes, Apple already has a library of movies and TV shows. If Apple wants to produce original content, they could start their own production company for a tiny fraction of Netflix’s $42 billion market cap. A fraction.

I don’t think it would be a good idea for Apple to buy Netflix, and not just because of the bad cultural fit. Apple doesn’t typically acquire the biggest player in the market. They usually go after smaller companies with strong, lean teams and good technology. Companies that could benefit from the exposure of Apple’s marketing.

Netflix is already too large to acquire and retains the baggage of their legacy DVD-by-mail service. As Gruber points out, it would become a huge distraction for Apple — pulling executives attention away from existing product lines. But they’re one of the few options in the market — Hulu, YouTube, and Amazon Instant Video being the other three.

I think, if Apple was to buy their way into this business, they’d go after a smaller company that most of us haven’t even heard of. Some startup with great technology, but very few content deals. But if nothing like this exists, they’re far more likely to roll their own service than acquire a big name like Netflix.