Tag Archive for ‘Macworld’

Deleting iOS Apps Stored by iTunes ➝

Glenn Fleishman, writing for Macworld:

When Apple updated iTunes to version 12.7, it overhauled the iOS/iTunes interaction. We ran a guide, “iTunes 12.7: How to cope with the abrupt changes,” which answered most of your questions. But one thing I noted in passing continues to come up: several readers have asked if they can really, really dump the iOS application files that iTunes retained after the upgrade.

You don’t need these. Really. You don’t. iTunes will never rely on them to sync back to your iOS device, and your Mac can’t do anything with them. Delete them. Go ahead.

This tip freed up 36GB of storage on my Mac Mini. And if you’ve been downloading iOS apps through iTunes, you might be able to reclaim a similar amount of storage on your machine. Glenn goes on to explain how to turn on content caching on your Mac, allowing you to more quickly download operating system and app updates on all the devices in your home.

Why Apple Should Make a Cheaper, Streamlined Apple TV ➝

Dan Moren, writing for Macworld:

I’m skeptical we’ll see any major changes to the Apple TV line this fall, but what I’m hoping for is this: a return to a lower cost Apple TV, somewhere in the $70-$99 range, with a modicum of storage, and perhaps a traditional remote with buttons. Instead of building Siri functionality into the remote, the Apple TV should have built-in mics that support “Hey Siri” (or, if you prefer to avoid collisions, “Hey Apple TV”). The Amazon Echo, Google Home, and yes, HomePod, have proved that both technology and people can handle this kind of functionality. If you prefer the Siri Remote, no problem: just buy it as an add-on.

I think Apple will offer a lower priced Apple TV soon. There’s already historical precedent for reducing the price of the previous model when a new model is introduced — the third-generation Apple TV was available for $69 for a period of time after the current Apple TV was released. I think they’ll do the same when a more powerful, 4K-capable Apple TV goes on sale this fall.

I don’t think they’ll reduce the price of the current Apple TV to $69, but maybe they could if they listen to Dan Moren’s advice and no longer include the more costly Siri Remote with this model and bundle their inexpensive Apple Remote instead. Even with that change, though, I think $99 would be more likely.

This would give Apple a fairly robust lineup — the current, fourth-generation Apple TV with the older Apple Remote for $99 alongside a more powerful, 4K Apple TV with the Siri Remote for $149. This would give customers a more affordable offering while continuing to position the Apple TV as premium products.

I’m not sold on Moren’s idea of integrating a microphone into the Apple TV, though. I’d certainly have to see how it was implemented before passing judgement on it, but it doesn’t seem like an elegant solution to me. Quietly speaking directly into the Siri Remote is so much less abrasive than yelling at your TV from across the room. I don’t know, maybe it would be great, but my initial reaction is that it would be worse in almost every way.

For a Bigger iPad to Work, iOS Needs Some Interface Improvements ➝

Jason Snell, writing for Macworld:

I believe that iOS’s future is big–and I mean that literally. The 12.9-inch iPad Pro I’m using to write this article is currently the largest iOS device in existence, but it seems inevitable that Apple will want to size up iOS even more, whether it’s in a 15- or 17-inch mega-tablet, or an even larger desktop iOS device similar to the style of Microsoft’s Surface Studio.

I absolutely agree. If iOS is the future of computing, devices with larger screens are inevitable. And I think Snell offers some great suggestions on how to improve the experience on these larger screens. Although, I think he missed an obvious one — external trackpad support.

What to Do With That Old iPhoto Library ➝

Glenn Fleishman, writing for Macworld:

Deleting a hard link in one place leaves all the other references intact. When the number of hard links drops to just one, you’ve just got a file! No hard links at all. And deleting that one reference, the file itself, truly does throw the file in the trash. Thus, delete your iPhoto Library, and—ostensibly—you won’t delete any files shared by Photos through hard links.

Having said all that, please make a complete backup of both your iPhoto and Photos libraries before deleting the iPhoto Library. You should be able to toss it and lose nothing, but I’m not so blithe as to suggest you whistle while you’re emptying the trash and assume all is well.

A great tip for anyone who has fully transitioned from iPhoto to Photos on the Mac.

How Apple Could Improve Family Sharing ➝

Jason Snell, writing for Macworld:

Family Sharing feels very much like a version 1.0, a first crack at the idea that people with their own Apple IDs also have intermingled real lives that should probably be intermingled digitally. Nearly two years after the release of iOS 8, however, not a whole lot has changed in the realm of family sharing. And it’s got some glaring deficiencies that really need to be addressed.

Jason runs down a few features that Apple could add to improve Family Sharing. And his list includes the one feature I want most — family photo libraries. It doesn’t make any sense that my wife and I have to maintain two separate libraries. It makes ordering prints, creating photo albums, and working on other creative projects significantly more difficult. I hope Apple fixes this soon.

Apple Should Give Customers Free iCloud Space to Match Their Devices ➝

Susie Ochs, writing for Macworld:

In the fall of 2014, Apple cut the prices on iCloud storage to fall more in line with competitors like Amazon and Google. But the best thing Apple could do is recognize that we’re already paying a lot to play in its garden, and throw in free iCloud storage that matches the capacities of our Macs, iPads, and iPhones.

Susie suggest that Apple should offer this extra storage for two years after the purchase of a new device. I doubt it’s going to happen for free, but what if this extra storage was another perk that came with AppleCare+?

The Trouble With 3D Touch ➝

Jason Snell, writing for Macworld:

Unfortunately, after six months of using an iPhone 6s, I’m afraid that I’ve completely stopped using 3D Touch, to the point where I forget it’s there. My opinion about how brilliantly implemented this feature is hasn’t changed a bit, but I feel like Apple needs to rethink the meaning of the 3D Touch in iOS 10 for it to be a more useful feature.[…]

Although Apple’s proud of the peek/pop interface that it unveiled with the iPhone 6s, I’m skeptical of its utility. Most of the time, when I accidentally initiate a “peek” of the content behind whatever I’m pressing on, it’s content I was already trying to see by tapping. Loading a “peek” doesn’t really take any more time than actually tapping on an item and loading the result, and returning back to the previous screen seems a lot less work than holding your finger on the glass while you peruse a “peek” to see if it’s worth opening the rest of the way.

I was always afraid that 3D Touch was more of a gimmick than a useful-in-real-life feature. I’ve tried to integrate it into the way I use my iPhone, but it just never took. As Snell points out in his piece, 3D Touch is often slower to use than simply tapping an item and tapping a back button. Unfortunately, it’s the type of feature that demos exceptionally well, but doesn’t actually improve my experience while using the device.

The 9.7-Inch iPad Pro Can Use Microsoft Office for Free ➝

Mark Hachman, writing for Macworld:

What Microsoft settled on to divide mobile and desktop users was screen size: specifically 10.1 inches. Anything smaller than that and users can pretty much do anything they want with the appropriate iOS, Windows, or Android app, including creating, editing, or sharing documents. But if you’re using the Office apps on a device whose primary screen is larger than 10.1 inches, Microsoft won’t let you create a new document, just edit and view an Office document created elsewhere.

That leaves the 12.9-inch iPad Pro as the only Apple tablet that doesn’t get to use this loophole.