Mike Becky

Tag Archive for ‘Macworld’

On macOS 13 Ventura Compatibility ➝

Karen Haslam, writing for MacWorld:

There will no doubt be a few Mac users who are disappointed by that list. Many of the Macs that are not supported by Ventura were still being sold by Apple until quite recently. The 2014 Mac mini was sold until 2018, the ‘trash can’ Mac Pro until 2019, and the 2017 MacBook Air was sold until July 2019. We had thought that Apple wouldn’t remove those Macs from the supported list, since people might have purchased the model such a short time ago.

Bear in mind, however, that these ‘unlucky’ Macs can stay on (or upgrade to) macOS Monterey, and will still be officially supported by Apple for at least two more years. They might not be able to use the latest features, but they’ll keep getting security patches and other ongoing support.

I don’t own any Macs that Apple is dropping support for in this round, but this is still a disappointment. Not being able to update to the latest operating system after, in some cases, just a few years of ownership is lame. Apple should be better than this.

(Via Rob Fahrni.)

➝ Source: macworld.com

iPhone Announced Fifteen Years Ago Today ➝

From the press release:

Apple today introduced iPhone, combining three products—a revolutionary mobile phone, a widescreen iPod with touch controls, and a breakthrough Internet communications device with desktop-class email, web browsing, searching and maps—into one small and lightweight handheld device. iPhone introduces an entirely new user interface based on a large multi-touch display and pioneering new software, letting users control iPhone with just their fingers. iPhone also ushers in an era of software power and sophistication never before seen in a mobile device, which completely redefines what users can do on their mobile phones.

Probably the best product announcement in modern history. And I sure miss Macworld, it always had so many cool little hardware and software introductions that were built specifically for the Apple users.

➝ Source: apple.com

iMessage Kept Off Android for iOS Lock-in ➝

Michael Simon, writing for Macworld:

In a “proposed findings of fact and conclusion of law” filing by Epic Games in its suit against Apple over the terms of the App Store, Epic revealed that Apple once considered a version of iMessage for Android but decided against it “as early as 2013,” just two years after it launched on iOS. Using information gleaned from depositions with senior Vice President Eddie Cue, along with comments from Apple fellow Phil Schiller and senior vice president Craig Federighi, Epic claims that Apple’s ultimately decided that the iMessage’s “serious lock-in” was more valuable to the company than cross-platform convenience.

I like Apple a lot. They do a lot of great things and make some excellent products, but they sure make awful decisions sometimes.

From a user perspective, there is no good reason to keep iMessage off of Android. And interestingly, if Apple shipped a version of iMessage for Android in 2013, they probably would have completely owned the messaging market. Especially given Google’s comparatively scattershot approach.

➝ Source: macworld.com

Deleting iOS Apps Stored by iTunes ➝

Glenn Fleishman, writing for Macworld:

When Apple updated iTunes to version 12.7, it overhauled the iOS/iTunes interaction. We ran a guide, “iTunes 12.7: How to cope with the abrupt changes,” which answered most of your questions. But one thing I noted in passing continues to come up: several readers have asked if they can really, really dump the iOS application files that iTunes retained after the upgrade.

You don’t need these. Really. You don’t. iTunes will never rely on them to sync back to your iOS device, and your Mac can’t do anything with them. Delete them. Go ahead.

This tip freed up 36GB of storage on my Mac Mini. And if you’ve been downloading iOS apps through iTunes, you might be able to reclaim a similar amount of storage on your machine. Glenn goes on to explain how to turn on content caching on your Mac, allowing you to more quickly download operating system and app updates on all the devices in your home.

Why Apple Should Make a Cheaper, Streamlined Apple TV ➝

Dan Moren, writing for Macworld:

I’m skeptical we’ll see any major changes to the Apple TV line this fall, but what I’m hoping for is this: a return to a lower cost Apple TV, somewhere in the $70-$99 range, with a modicum of storage, and perhaps a traditional remote with buttons. Instead of building Siri functionality into the remote, the Apple TV should have built-in mics that support “Hey Siri” (or, if you prefer to avoid collisions, “Hey Apple TV”). The Amazon Echo, Google Home, and yes, HomePod, have proved that both technology and people can handle this kind of functionality. If you prefer the Siri Remote, no problem: just buy it as an add-on.

I think Apple will offer a lower priced Apple TV soon. There’s already historical precedent for reducing the price of the previous model when a new model is introduced — the third-generation Apple TV was available for $69 for a period of time after the current Apple TV was released. I think they’ll do the same when a more powerful, 4K-capable Apple TV goes on sale this fall.

I don’t think they’ll reduce the price of the current Apple TV to $69, but maybe they could if they listen to Dan Moren’s advice and no longer include the more costly Siri Remote with this model and bundle their inexpensive Apple Remote instead. Even with that change, though, I think $99 would be more likely.

This would give Apple a fairly robust lineup — the current, fourth-generation Apple TV with the older Apple Remote for $99 alongside a more powerful, 4K Apple TV with the Siri Remote for $149. This would give customers a more affordable offering while continuing to position the Apple TV as premium products.

I’m not sold on Moren’s idea of integrating a microphone into the Apple TV, though. I’d certainly have to see how it was implemented before passing judgement on it, but it doesn’t seem like an elegant solution to me. Quietly speaking directly into the Siri Remote is so much less abrasive than yelling at your TV from across the room. I don’t know, maybe it would be great, but my initial reaction is that it would be worse in almost every way.

For a Bigger iPad to Work, iOS Needs Some Interface Improvements ➝

Jason Snell, writing for Macworld:

I believe that iOS’s future is big–and I mean that literally. The 12.9-inch iPad Pro I’m using to write this article is currently the largest iOS device in existence, but it seems inevitable that Apple will want to size up iOS even more, whether it’s in a 15- or 17-inch mega-tablet, or an even larger desktop iOS device similar to the style of Microsoft’s Surface Studio.

I absolutely agree. If iOS is the future of computing, devices with larger screens are inevitable. And I think Snell offers some great suggestions on how to improve the experience on these larger screens. Although, I think he missed an obvious one — external trackpad support.

What to Do With That Old iPhoto Library ➝

Glenn Fleishman, writing for Macworld:

Deleting a hard link in one place leaves all the other references intact. When the number of hard links drops to just one, you’ve just got a file! No hard links at all. And deleting that one reference, the file itself, truly does throw the file in the trash. Thus, delete your iPhoto Library, and—ostensibly—you won’t delete any files shared by Photos through hard links.

Having said all that, please make a complete backup of both your iPhoto and Photos libraries before deleting the iPhoto Library. You should be able to toss it and lose nothing, but I’m not so blithe as to suggest you whistle while you’re emptying the trash and assume all is well.

A great tip for anyone who has fully transitioned from iPhoto to Photos on the Mac.

How Apple Could Improve Family Sharing ➝

Jason Snell, writing for Macworld:

Family Sharing feels very much like a version 1.0, a first crack at the idea that people with their own Apple IDs also have intermingled real lives that should probably be intermingled digitally. Nearly two years after the release of iOS 8, however, not a whole lot has changed in the realm of family sharing. And it’s got some glaring deficiencies that really need to be addressed.

Jason runs down a few features that Apple could add to improve Family Sharing. And his list includes the one feature I want most — family photo libraries. It doesn’t make any sense that my wife and I have to maintain two separate libraries. It makes ordering prints, creating photo albums, and working on other creative projects significantly more difficult. I hope Apple fixes this soon.