Tag Archive for ‘Internet of Things’

Hacked Cameras, DVRs Powered Yesterday’s Internet Outage ➝

Brian Krebs:

At first, it was unclear who or what was behind the attack on Dyn. But over the past few hours, at least one computer security firm has come out saying the attack involved Mirai, the same malware strain that was used in the record 620 Gpbs attack on my site last month. At the end September 2016, the hacker responsible for creating the Mirai malware released the source code for it, effectively letting anyone build their own attack army using Mirai.

Mirai scours the Web for IoT devices protected by little more than factory-default usernames and passwords, and then enlists the devices in attacks that hurl junk traffic at an online target until it can no longer accommodate legitimate visitors or users.

Setting aside the shoddy security of these devices, yesterday felt incredibly weird. I spent most of my work day without access to Twitter and it was a miserable experience. The service has become an important part of my life, it’s where I communicate with my friends and first hear about important news. Without it, I feel eerily disconnected. I actually had to type a URL into my browser to find out why the service was down.

Google OnHub is All About the Smart Home ➝

At first, Google’s OnHub announcement felt a little out of place to me. But I quickly realized that it’s all about the internet of things — by the way, can someone please come up with a better term. Google needs hardware inside of your network to act as a relay which helps you control devices remotely. And it looks like their newly announced $199 wireless router will do just that.

Chris Burns, writing for SlashGear:

Google OnHub was revealed today by Google as the first doorway to a full smart home ecosystem. This service will be tied together with software protocols revealed in part earlier this year as Google Brillo and Google Weave. […]

Google OnHub will be the first Google Brillo device.

As for the router, it’s an attractive piece of hardware with impressive features and an easy-to-configure interface. It’s a little expensive compared to other routers on the market. But if you’re interested in buying it, you probably want it specifically for its unique features.

Personally, I wouldn’t even consider the OnHub for my home network. I have a couple of computers that I prefer to connect to my router with Ethernet and I rely on my Time Capsule’s hard drive for local Time Machine backups — both of which aren’t possible with the OnHub.