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Tag Archive for ‘Social’

ActivityPub Support on WordPress.com ➝

Matthias Pfefferle:

The revolutionary ActivityPub feature is now available across all WordPress.com plans, unlocking a world of engagement and interaction for your blog. Your blogs can now be part of the rapidly expanding fediverse, which enables you to connect with a broader audience and attract more followers. […]

ActivityPub is a WordPress plugin that facilitates seamless integration between your blog and a host of federated platforms, including Mastodon, Pleroma, Friendica, and more. This plugin empowers your readers to follow your blog posts on these platforms.

In addition, replies to your posts from these platforms are automatically turned into comments on your WordPress blog, creating a more interactive and dynamic conversation around your content.

I’m very happy to see this launch. It feels more and more like ActivityPub is going to be the social protocol of choice going forward.

➝ Source: wordpress.com

On Internet Silos ➝

Manuel Moreale:

The more I think and read about it, the more I’m convinced that there’s no solution to the centralisation issue we’re currently facing. And that’s because I think that fundamentally people are, when it comes to the internet, lazy. And gathering where everyone else is definitely seems easier. It’s also easier to delegate the job of moderating and policing to someone else and so as a result people will inevitably cluster around a few big websites, no matter what infrastructure we build.

This is likely true. And that’s okay.

Most people use Gmail. It has the highest marketshare among email services. But that doesn’t mean there isn’t room for ProtonMail, Fastmail, and others to succeed in the space. As for social networks, yes, most people are going to congregate on a small number of services, but that doesn’t mean Mastodon and other alternatives can’t be successful in their own right.

Mastodon winning doesn’t mean Twitter needs to lose.

➝ Source: manuelmoreale.com

Some High-Profile Facebook Users Exempt From Rules ➝

Dan Milmo, writing for The Guardian:

The XCheck or “CrossCheck” system steers reviews of posts by well-known users such as celebrities, politicians and journalists into a separate system, according to an investigation by the Wall Street Journal. Under the programme, some users are “whitelisted” – not subject to enforcement action – while others are allowed to post material that violates Facebook rules, pending content reviews that often do not take place.

People are placed on the XCheck list – where they are given special scrutiny – if they meet criteria such as being “newsworthy”, “influential or popular” or “PR risky”. Names on the XCheck programme included Donald Trump, US senator Elizabeth Warren and Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, although the report does not state whether those names were whitelisted at any point. By 2020 there were 5.8 million users on the XCheck list, the Wall Street Journal said.

Facebook has too much influence on society. And that isn’t going to change until people start leaving.

I would encourage everyone to delete their Facebook account and use something else — preferably something decentralized like Mastodon. Even if you don’t have any friends on it yet, be the early adopter. Be the one that convinces your friends to get out of the walled garden and start exploring the open web.

➝ Source: theguardian.com

Webmention ➝

I’ve been toying around with this on mike.rockwell.mx using the WordPress plugin and Semantic-Linkbacks. I don’t know how often it will come up when linking to other sites or other sites linking to me — since Webmention doesn’t have widespread usage. But Micro.blog — my preferred social network — supports the technology.

So anyone that replies to a Micro.blog post that originated on mike.rockwell.mx will be sent to my site as a Webmention. It works well and it’s really rad.

Implementing Webmention on Initial Charge is on my to do list. I’ve always accepted and sent pingbacks, but don’t have the received notifications visible anywhere on the live site. It’s likely that Webmentions will be implemented in a similar manor. But this is the type of technology that I’d like to see adopted more broadly. It would allow for more social features in the open web and could be encourage some to spend less time in the walled gardens.

➝ Source: indieweb.org

Twitter’s Not a Lost Cause ➝

Dave Winer:

When people say Twitter, the company, is a lost cause they are out of their minds or don’t understand systems. Twitter works. There’s a company behind it that makes it work. The service has a lot of value, not just as servers, but that it’s all together in one place. If that were to break it could never be replaced. Look at the void left after Napster’s demise for a clue. Set us back 20-30 years.

But it’s not just the system, the employees, or the company itself that has value. There’s also a great deal of value in having all of these users in one place. Not to mention the identity aspect of Twitter — every athlete, journalist, and celebrity has a Twitter account. And that’s where fans are pointed to if they want to learn more about them. Nobody gives out their URL anymore, it’s always their Twitter handle.

‘Nothing Twitter Is Doing Is Working’ ➝

The most important thing for Twitter to do is improve the sign-up process. New users have no idea how to find good people to follow or why they should be using the service in the first place. If I was running Twitter, I’d start there.