Tag Archive for ‘Peter Cohen’

Best Backup Plan for Your Mac ➝

Peter Cohen and Lory Gil, writing for iMore:

If you’re using any one, individual technique to make sure your Mac is backed up, you may be wondering why you have to combine strategies at all. The main reason is redundancy: You don’t want a single point of failure in the system to keep you from gaining access to the files that you need.

My current backup system includes all of my Macs running Time Machine pointed at our Time Capsule and myself occasionally making clones with SuperDuper. I know it’s not as comprehensive as it should be. Here are the two main problems:

  • I don’t have an offsite backup.
  • There’s no system in place for regular SuperDuper clones — I do them when I think about it, which is less frequently than I should.

What I hope to do in the future is sign up for BackBlaze, which will give me an offsite solution, and setup a reminder system for cloning.

The MacBook Doesn’t Need More Ports ➝

Peter Cohen:

While I understand the argument in favor of increasingly the expandability of the MacBook – yes, that single USB-C port is maddening – I’m willing to accept that Apple has a very different concept of what this computer should do than people who criticize it. The MacBook, unlike any other Mac laptop, is designed to be as wireless as possible.

I’m not discounting that some Mac users need wires to connect things like external hard drives, displays and other peripherals. Using a port replicator or the devices offered by Apple and other third parties, you can expand the MacBook’s connectivity. You can attach an external display. You can hook up an external hard drive. And so on. But ultimately, you’re trying to wedge a square peg in a round hole – the MacBook simply isn’t made with that in mind.

If you need more ports than the MacBook offers, don’t buy it — no one’s forcing you to. And there’s no sense in getting mad about one particular notebook line when the MacBook Pro and Air are both perfectly suitable alternatives.

The End of the Line for the Second-generation Apple TV ➝

Peter Cohen, writing for iMore:

The second and third-generation Apple TV runs a variant of iOS, and the new Apple TV 7.0 software is the first release based on iOS 8. iOS 8’s minimum system requirements exclude the original iPhone 4, which uses the same microprocessor as the second-gen Apple TV.

I’ve had my second-generation Apple TV in the living room since I bought it years ago. When I purchased an additional Apple TV it ended up in the bedroom so that I wouldn’t have to uproot the living room’s media setup and move it (because I’m lazy sometimes). That third-generation Apple TV remained in the bedroom until last night when I made the swap.

I knew that at some point I was going to have to swap the two Apple TVs because Apple would start leaving features out of updates for the second-generation model. And, that update came last week.

How to Unhide /Users in OS X 10.9.3 ➝

Peter Cohen, writing for iMore:

Hiding the Users directory is a little more strange. If you use your Mac exclusively and haven’t set up any additional user accounts, this may not be a big deal. But if you’re working on a shared Mac and occasionally need to access the other user directories on your computer (say, to copy files between users), this can create a real problem.

I don’t have any multiple-user-computers in my house, but I can imagine that the Users directory disappearing could be extremely irritating for those type of computer owners.

Peter’s instructions on how to unhide the Users directory are very easy to follow — your essentially one Terminal command away from getting your Users directory back.

What iPhone 4’s Gyroscope Means for Gaming ➝

Peter Cohen reporting for The Loop:

When the output of the iPhone’s gyroscope is paired with the output from the accelerometer, iPhone developers will now be able to create applications that can sense motion on six axes – up/down, left/right, forward/backward, combined with rotation around three perpendicular axes – pitch, yaw, and roll.