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Tag Archive for ‘Olympics’

We Shouldn’t Want Twitter to Handle Harassment Like Olympics Takedowns ➝

Speaking of Twitter, Adi Robertson wrote a great piece discussing the comparison of Olympic takedowns to the handling of harassment on the social network:

Twitter could absolutely do more to mitigate harassment, but likening it to people posting Olympics GIFs won’t give us good solutions. And in the end, it makes the problem of abuse seem simpler than it is. “Is this video of the Olympics?” is a far easier question to answer than “is this harassment?” Likewise, no matter how stringent it is, takedowns wouldn’t actually stop people from seeing torrents of threats in the first place — copyright owners themselves hate the endless, whack-a-mole nature of the system. Twitter’s anti-harassment battle is a crisis of identity for the platform, and it’s fighting an enemy that’s far uglier and more insidious than some clever IOC-rules-flouting meme-crafters. We can point out its losses without legitimizing one bad system in the name of criticizing another.

On the NBC Olympics Streaming App ➝

Jason Snell, writing on Six Colors:

However, there are some rough spots, too. As Todd Vaziri noted, the top-level heading on the NBC Apple TV app for almost every item is “Olympic Sports.” This makes it nearly impossible to tell if you’re going to see tennis, or handball, or table tennis, or rugby, until you click and then sit through a 15- or 30-second preroll ad.

So close… and yet so far. It’s not as if the app doesn’t understand what all those sports are—there’s a Filter feature that will show you just the video for the sport you select—but it makes it impossible to browse through a menu of live streams and see which event strikes your fancy.

Snell doesn’t even mention the atrocious playback controls, which is the most infuriating part of the app. For whatever reason, NBC decided to roll their own media playback system and its a pain in the ass to use. Want to skip back a few seconds to rewatch a tumbling pass? Good luck. Before you know it, you’ve rewound 30 minutes and have no idea how to get back where you started.