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Tag Archive for ‘Nick Statt’

Anker’s Atom PD 1 Charger Ships This Month for $29.99 ➝

Nick Statt, reporting for The Verge:

Anker, once known as a leading accessory maker and now a multi-faceted consumer electronics company, hasn’t abandoned its roots as a supplier of some of the fastest and highest-quality chargers around. The company’s newest line of ultrafast chargers, the PowerPort Atom series, is set to start shipping its first device later this month, the company announced today during CES. The Atom PD 1, as it’s called, was originally announced back in October, but the product was ultimately delayed a few months. The company now says it should be available for the same price of $29.99 later in January, though a concrete ship date has not yet been set.

This looks like it’s going to be a killer product. And I couldn’t be more excited that it’s capable of powering my MacBook Air.

But I suspect the model coming out later — the PowerPort Atom PD 2 — is going to become my go-to charger while traveling. The PD 2 is a 60W charger with two USB-C ports, which will feel right at home inside of my tech bag that’s slowly transitioning to USB-C everything.

Twitter Now Lets Anyone Request a Verified Account ➝

Nick Statt, writing for The Verge:

Starting today, the company will let users request a verified account on its website by filling out a form with a verified phone number and email address, a profile photo, and additional information regarding why verification is required or helpful. In defining who will get approved, Twitter still says “an account may be verified if it is determined to be of public interest.” Prior to today, Twitter tended only to verify public figures, brands, and people in media, politics, sports, business, and other high-profile sectors.

That line about “public interest” is going to keep normals from having verified accounts. Hell, they won’t even give the checkmark to Federico Viticci. This is definitely a step in the right direction, but I hope they continue to lower the barrier to entry.

‘I Performed Open Heart Surgery on My Mac Mini, and It Was Horrifying’ ➝

Nick Statt, writing for The Verge:

Now, Macs are notoriously hard to upgrade, and that’s by design. This I know well from simple cases like RAM upgrades. But I was not at all prepared for the massive undertaking the late 2014-era Mac mini requires of users. And simply to reach one of maybe only two parts an average computer owner may ever want to upgrade on their own. It involved painstakingly dismantling the entire machine piece by piece, using janky tools in place of the specialized ones I didn’t have. It was yet another much-needed reminder that Apple goes out of its way to make tinkering a herculean task.

A suggestion to anyone planning to upgrade their Apple hardware: buy every single suggested tool in iFixit’s corresponding repair guide. I recently upgraded the hard drive and RAM in my 2011 Mac mini and I used every tool listed in iFixit’s guide — even the silly-looking spudger tool. I don’t think I would have been able to complete the upgrade without them.

Apple’s Internet TV Service Said to Be on Hold ➝

Nick Statt, writing for The Verge:

Apple has “pressed the hold button” on its live television service, in the words of CBS president Les Moonves. The broadcasting executive spoke today at Business Insider’s Ignition conference in New York, saying Apple was “looking for a service” but ultimately decided to put it on the back burner. Apple hoped to unveil a streaming TV service next year — if not sooner — but pricing disputes for content deals were to said to have continually pushed it back. Now, Moonves seems to suggests it may no longer be an immediate priority.

I wonder how much longer Apple could wait and still make this service a success. Netflix and YouTube pretty much own the market and for an incredibly large portion of users, they are Internet video. Even with Apple’s resources, it’s going to be one hell of an uphill battle.

Apple Bans Over 250 Apps That Secretly Accessed Users’ Personal Information ➝

Nick Statt, writing for The Verge:

Apple today removed more than 250 apps from its App Store that were using software from a Chinese advertising company that secretly accessed and stored users’ personal information. The firm, called Youmi, provided app makers with a software development kit that would glean which apps a user had downloaded, that user’s email address, and the serial number of their smartphone, according to mobile security company SourceDNA. The apps in total received 1 million downloads.

The app makers that relied on Youmi’s SDK, most of which are ​based​ in China, may not have knowingly violated Apple’s security and privacy guidelines. “We believe the developers of these apps aren’t aware of this since the SDK is delivered in binary form, obfuscated, and user info is uploaded to Youmi’s server, not the app’s. We recommend developers stop using this SDK until this code is removed,” reads SourceDNA’s blog post.