Tag Archive for ‘Browser’

Laboratory, a Firefox Add-on for Generating Content Security Policies ➝

I got on a kick of implementing security-related headers on Initial Charge this week. Most of these were fairly easy to add, simply copy and pasting some code from various tutorials into my .htaccess file and then testing. But Content Security Policy was a major pain. It essentially tells the browser what content is allowed to run on webpages and where it can load that content from.

This add-on made the process much easier. Once installed, I opened the add-on’s menu, enabled recording of my site, then browsed to every type of page I could think of — on the front-end and the backend. The add-on kept a running tab on all the different types of content loaded and where it was loaded from. Then I grabbed the markup provided from within the add-on’s menu and added it to the site’s .htaccess file.

I’m using some declarations that are considered unsafe, notably the ability to run inline JavaScript and CSS. But now that I have the header implemented, I can go through the process of adjusting that content to run from safer sources and then change my security headers accordingly.

➝ Source: addons.mozilla.org

Apple Considering Letting Users Change Default Email App and Browser on iOS ➝

Mark Gurman, reporting for Bloomberg:

The technology giant is discussing whether to let users choose third-party web browser and mail applications as their default options on Apple’s mobile devices, replacing the company’s Safari browser and Mail app, according to people familiar with the matter.

This is a huge step in the right direction. And I wouldn’t mind them giving developers the ability to release web browsers with their own rendering engines as well.

➝ Source: bloomberg.com

Firefox to Start Blocking Flash Content in August ➝

Sebastian Anthony, reporting for ArsTechnica:

Firefox will begin retiring Adobe Flash on August 2 with the release of Firefox 48. In 2017, probably with Firefox 53, Flash plug-ins will require the user to actively click-to-play.

First we learned that Google Chrome was going to begin phasing out Flash later this year and now Firefox is following in their footsteps. This is a trend I can get behind.

Why I’m Not Crazy for Making Safari My Default Browser ➝

Matt Birchler:

I don’t think that Safari is the best browser for everyone, and I don’t think Chrome is the only other game in town either. Some people love Opera, while others are getting excited for Vivaldi, and Firefox still has its supporters. But there is a mass of people who scoff at those who use anything besides Chrome, and I wanted to explain why some of us use it over the Goliath in the room. Chrome is great, but so is Safari.

Matt makes some great points in this piece, but I think he missed one of the biggest reasons for using Safari instead of Chrome — significantly better battery life. I can understand why it was omitted from his list, though, his primary home computer is a Mac mini.

Google Chrome to Phase Out Adobe Flash Later This Year ➝

Interestingly, I started using Google Chrome as a way to phase out Flash in 2010, upon the recommendation of John Gruber.

Introducing Safari Technology Preview ➝

Ricky Mondello, from Apple’s Safari team:

Starting today, there’s a new, convenient way to see what features and improvements are coming to Safari and other applications that use WebKit. Safari Technology Preview is a version of Safari for OS X, distributed by Apple, that includes a cutting-edge, in-development version of the WebKit browser engine. It’s a great way to test upcoming WebKit features and give feedback to the people building them when it’s most useful — early in development.

Installing this doesn’t affect your existing copy of Safari and they can be run side by side to compare behaviors between them. I’ll be installing this on my MacBook later tonight. Though, given how infrequently I use the machine, I don’t expect I’ll launch it very often.

Firefox for iOS ➝

In case you’re into that sort of thing.

A New Browser for Our Friends ➝

Vivaldi is a new web browser from Jon von Tetzchner, former CEO of Opera. It’s built on the Chromium rendering engine and is targeted at power users, with Quick Commands, Speed Dials, and Tab Stacks being a few of its landmark features.

I’ve spent a little while using it and it feels remarkably stable for a technical preview. I can’t say I’m a fan of the browser’s design, though — I don’t like that portions of the interface change colors based on the web page you’re viewing, but to each their own.

I’m not optimistic that Vivaldi will last, simply because the market is so much more mature than it was a decade ago. Don’t get me wrong, I’d love to see a larger variety of successful web browsers, but I don’t see any evidence that people are willing to switch to a new one without the help of a multi-billion dollar company promoting it.