Mike Becky

Tag Archive for ‘Apple TV’

Home Screens to Begin 2024

Last year I published my home screens at the beginning of January and declared that it will be an annual tradition. Following up that this year with my home screens below.

It’s worth noting that I had a dedicated gaming handheld last year, but that is no longer the case. Instead I’m using my iPhone as my gaming handheld, paired with the Backbone one to play games in Steam Link, PPSSPP, and RetroArch.

iPhone 15 Pro Home Screen

iPhone 15 Pro

iPad Pro Home Screen 2024

iPad Pro, 11-inch

Ubuntu 22.04 Virtual Machine

13-inch MacBook Air with M2

This is actually a screenshot of a virtual machine running Ubuntu 22.04. The MacBook is primarily a work machine and I had previously setup a separate user account on it for personal stuff. This year I decided to move that to a virtual machine instead, which makes it easier to switch back and forth for quick breaks throughout my work day.

Apple TV 4K Home Screen

Apple TV 4K

Apple Watch Faces

Apple Watch Series 5

iOS 17.2 and tvOS 17.2 Kills TV Show and Movie Wishlists ➝

Juli clover, writing for MacRumors:

In the iTunes Store app on the iPhone and iPad, and the separate iTunes TV Shows and iTunes Movies apps on the ‌Apple TV‌, there were options to add TV shows and movies to a dedicated wishlist when browsing, which consumers used to save the content for later and watch for sales.

The wishlists did not transfer over to the ‌Apple TV‌ app with these updates, so some customers who had compiled long watch lists are unable to access those curated lists or copy them over to a new location. Some users are able to open up the iTunes Store app on iOS devices and tap on the hamburger button in the upper right corner to see their wishlists, but this does not appear to be working for everyone. Those who compiled lists on the ‌Apple TV‌ appear to have no way to access them.

I’ve also noticed that there is no option to view a preview of TV show episodes in the TV app either, which was available in the dedicated iTunes TV Shows app.

A warning on this would have been nice, but I hate that they’re doing it regardless. If I want to browse TV shows or movies to purchase on my Apple TV, all the iTunes Store content is commingled with media that’s only available on streaming. Even if you stick to the “Store” section, you’ll see plenty of movies and shows that require Apple TV+ or another streaming app and subscription to view.

➝ Source: macrumors.com

iTunes Movies and TV Shows Apps Discontinued With New Apple TV Update ➝

Benjamin Mayo, writing for 9 to 5 Mac:

As first reported in October, Apple will discontinue the standalone iTunes Movies and iTunes TV Shows apps on the Apple TV box, starting with tvOS 17.2 The warning message seen above has started appearing in the release candidate version of tvOS 17.2 beta, released yesterday.

Apple directs users to the TV app instead to manage their purchases, and buy and rent from the store. At least as far as Apple’s video content is concerned, the iTunes brand is on the way out.

I strip the DRM from every movie and TV show I purchase through iTunes. This lets me watch it in my preferred player — Plex. And I never have to worry about losing access because of some irritating rights issues.

But because of this, it’s not often that I use the TV Shows, Movies, or Apple TV apps. On the rare occasion when I want to watch purchased content before I have a chance to process it, though, I always use the TV Shows and Movies apps. It’s just a much nicer experience without having to trudge through all of the Apple TV+ promotion.

➝ Source: 9to5mac.com

Siri Remote Connection Issues With New Apple TV 4K ➝

Tim Hardwick, writing for MacRumors:

An increasing number of third-generation Apple TV 4K owners are reporting connection issues with the Siri Remote that are only temporarily resolved by either restarting the remote or power cycling the set-top box.

I’ve been experiencing this lately. It’s annoying, to say the least.

➝ Source: macrumors.com

Home Screens to Begin 2023

I haven’t been sharing my home screens as regularly as I’d prefer, so I thought I’d just publish screenshots from each of my current devices at the beginning of the year and plan to do the same each year going forward.

iPhone 13 Pro

iPad Pro, 11-inch

MacBook Air with M2

Apple TV 4K

Retroid Pocket 3

Apple Watch Series 5

The New Apple TV 4K ➝

It now comes with the A12 Bionic and is capable of playing back HDR content at 60 frames per second. There’s a nifty new video calibration feature that uses your iPhone’s front-facing sensors. But the biggest change is the new remote.

From a design perspective, it looks like a merger of the Siri Remote and their previous aluminum Apple remote. They’ve added a mute button and power button, moved the Siri button to the side, and introduced new directional controls.

The directional control section is touch enabled to allow for quickly scrolling through lists, has clickable direction buttons for precise movement, and the outer edge can be used like a scroll-wheel for scrubbing.

I’m going to reserve judgement on the remote for now — I need to use one to really have a good idea. But at first glance it seems ugly, yet functional.

It’s worth noting, the new remote will be available for $59 and is compatible with all tvOS-based Apple TVs.

➝ Source: apple.com

Why Does the Apple TV Still Exist? ➝

First, a bit of an excursion regarding the Apple TV’s remote — Jason Snell:

Look, I know the Apple TV Remote doesn’t have a lot going for it. It’s impossible to orient properly by touch, and a stray finger swipe can end up losing your place in whatever movie or TV show you’re watching. There are so many reasons to dislike it. And yet… I also kind of like the Apple TV Remote, if only because it enables rapid scrubbing through content (click the touchpad, then swipe left or right to move the cursor) in an efficient way that I haven’t seen from any other remote I’ve used. I like it. It’s not enough to make me recommend an Apple TV to anyone, but it’s enough for me to keep using my existing Apple TV and keep using the Apple TV remote rather than just switching full-time to my Logitech Harmony universal remote. And while I don’t really use Siri on Apple TV, I have friends who swear by it, especially its clever feature to jump back in time and turn on captioning to clarify a line of dialogue.

The remote deserves some criticism, but it receives far more than it should. Every TV and set-top-box remote is basically garbage and it seems like everyone forgets that when discussing the Apple TV remote.

I’ve been a fan of the Siri Remote since day one. The ability to control HomeKit devices with my voice, being able to quickly swipe through lists, and essentially acting as a universal remote is just so nice. We don’t use any other remotes in our house. The Apple TV remote turns our TV on and off, controls the volume of our receiver, and interacts with the only non-game console connected to our television.

I would argue that it’s actually the best TV remote I’ve ever used.

But back to Snell:

Which brings us back to the original question: Why does this product still exist, and is there anywhere for it to go next? Gruber and Thompson suggest that perhaps the way forward is to lean into an identity as a low-end gaming console. Maybe amp up the processor power, bundle a controller, and try to use Apple Arcade to emphasize that this is a box that is for more than watching video.

Apple should, absolutely, continue building the Apple TV. Because people who are really serious about software should make their own hardware.

Apple can’t control what other set-top-box and TV manufacturers do. If they were to develop a new video codec, a new technology for streaming video that requires a dedicated hardware chip, the ability to hand-off video from iPhones like you can with audio to a HomePod — what are the chances that these other companies would support it? How long would they support it for? What if their implementation didn’t work well?

If Apple wants to be in the living room, they need to make their own box to ensure a rock solid, predictable experience. I’m actually surprised that companies like Netflix and Hulu aren’t building their own boxes too.

➝ Source: sixcolors.com

Button Remote for Apple TV by Function101 ➝

I’m one of the few that actually likes the Siri Remote — I appreciate its small size, ability to control the volume on my receiver, its ability to turn on and off my television, and way I can quickly scroll through lists with the trackpad. But if you’re looking for an alternative, this remote by Function101 seems like an excellent option. It offers a more traditional button layout and is designed to work with the Apple TV.

➝ Source: function101.com