Tag Archive for ‘Advertising’

Twitter to Stop Accepting Political Ads ➝

Jack Dorsey:

We’ve made the decision to stop all political advertising on Twitter globally. We believe political message reach should be earned, not bought.

The pessimistic take is that Twitter is taking the easy way out. They’re not leaving much money on the table by no longer accepting political ads and it gives them an opportunity to sidestep the whole conversation — dodging any potential heat from ads in the upcoming elections.

But this isn’t something Twitter needed to do. And their reasoning is sound. Good ideas tend to rise to the top and removing the influence of money might help ensure that no one has an unfair advantage in the overall political conversation.

➝ Source: mobile.twitter.com

Twitterrific Ad Network ➝

Ged Maheux, writing on Iconfactory’s weblog:

Now you can advertise your app, website, product or service directly on Twitterrific’s expansive network of tech-savvy users for just $100 a month. For that price we guarantee 1,000 tap-throughs – not impressions but actual visits – to your App Store page or website. What’s more, we take care of creating the ad for you ourselves and even provide App Analytics for iOS or Google Analytics for websites.

This is pretty rad news. And at $100 a month, I’m tempted to buy an ad for Initial Charge just for the hell of it.

As an aside, I kind of wish the folks at Iconfactory or a similarly respectable indie developer shop would build out an ad network like this and make it available by invitation to other developers. Sort of like The Deck, but for iOS apps.

‘The Thinnest Tightrope They Can Walk Between What Is and Is Not Considered Creepy’ ➝

Nick Heer, on Google and Facbook’s ability to associate offline purchases with online advertising views:

For this to be effective, there has to be some association made between a purchaser, whether they have seen an ad, and how that campaign was delivered — through social media, a general website, and so forth. Therefore, there must be enough information to correlate the three factors, which is enough information for specific purchases to be tracked back to an individual. If there isn’t that level of granularity, the service is pointless, isn’t it? […]

When Apple launched Apple Pay, they made a point of stating that they don’t track transactions over time. I don’t think Apple’s privacy protections necessarily prevent Google and Facebook from associating purchases with ad views, but it can’t hurt to consider using services from companies that build privacy protections into their products and services, instead of those that try to find the thinnest tightrope they can walk between what is and is not considered creepy.

Google AMP Gets Mixed Reviews From Publishers ➝

Jack Marshall, writing for the Wall Street Journal:

In recent months Google has begun including many more links to stripped-down AMP pages in its mobile search results. This has directed more traffic to those AMP pages and less to publishers’ full mobile websites. Google said in a Sept. 21 blog post that AMP search results would be introduced across search engine results pages worldwide “in the coming weeks.”

For some publishers that is a problem, since their AMP pages do not currently generate advertising revenue at the same rate as their full mobile sites. Multiple publishers said an AMP pageview currently generates around half as much revenue as a pageview on their full mobile websites.

Here’s a novel idea, stop using AMP entirely and build leaner web pages.

Adblock Plus Has Already Defeated Facebook’s Ad Blocking Restrictions ➝

Jacob Kastrenakes, writing for The Verge:

Facebook’s plan to stop ad blockers has already been foiled. Adblock Plus has found a way to strip ads from Facebook, even when they’re served up in Facebook’s new ad blocker-proof format. Anyone with a fully updated version of Adblock Plus should once again be able to avoid ads in Facebook’s sidebar and News Feed.

Let the game of cat and mouse begin.

Tumblr to Introduce Ad Platform ➝

From the Tumblr Staff weblog:

On Thursday, we’re going to introduce ads on Tumblrs, so that later this year people can start making money from their blogs.

Tumblr is a place where brilliant, creative, funny, impossible people shape culture. Some of you have even turned your passions into jobs: book deals, music careers, paid gigs with the Creatrs program. Now, (soon!) that opportunity will be available to any eligible Tumblr—poet, musician, fan artist, and misfit weirdo memelord alike.

It’s fascinating that a service as old as Tumblr has gone this long without an advertising platform. The service is nearly ten years old and features one of the most vibrant communities on the Internet. I would have expected something like this shortly after their acquisition by Yahoo in 2013. But here we are, three years later, and it’s just now launching.

Amazon Will Start Subsidizing Android Phones With ‘Special Offer’ Ads on the Lock Screens ➝

Lauren Goode, writing for The Verge:

Amazon today said it would begin offering Prime members significant discounts on select unlocked Android smartphones, in exchange for the ability to pre-install Amazon apps and show customers more ads on the phones.

Right now the deal only applies to two smartphones — the new Motorola Moto G and the BLU R1 HD — neither of which is available yet in the US, but are expected to ship on July 12th. The lock screen ads are not dissimilar from the ads that appear on Amazon’s Kindle e-readers and Kindle Fire tablets with “special offers,” as Amazon calls them.

How long will it take for hackers to build one-click tools that root these phones and remove the “special offers” and Amazon apps?

The New App Store ➝

Faster review times, subscription pricing, and search ads — all of which would be huge news on their own — are all coming to the App Store. I think these changes will be good overall. The faster review times give developers a little more assurance that bug fixes will go live in a timely manner and search ads will help developers find a steady stream of new customers. I’m still a little lukewarm on the subscription pricing change, though.

My biggest fear is that developers will ask too much for their apps and I’ll be forced to pay an unreasonable monthly fee in order to continue using them. In an ideal world, for me at least, developers of high-quality productivity apps will charge a yearly fee at a price point similar to what they charge to purchase the app today.

I’m excited to see how these changes play out, but I expect they’ll result in a more healthy ecosystem for developers and users alike. And with announcements like this coming the week before WWDC, it feels like we’re in for one hell of a keynote. Phil Schiller even referenced this at the beginning of his call with John Gruber:

We’ve got a bunch of App Store/developer-related announcements for WWDC next week, but frankly, we’ve got a busy enough keynote that we decided we’re not going to cover those in the keynote. And rather, just cover them in the afternoon and throughout the week.

I’m really glad Phil Schiller was put in charge of the App Store.