Linked List Archive

Why Apple Is Missing the Boat on Home Wi-Fi ➝

Kirk McElhearn, writing for Intego’s mac security weblog:

A mesh wi-fi system could form part of a broader Apple home network. Imagine if the HomePod, Apple TV, or future Apple in-home devices, acted as a satellite for a wi-fi access point, as well as being a HomeKit hub; this could get more people to buy these media devices, knowing that they would serve more than one purpose.

In addition, the Time Capsule, an AirPort base station with a built-in hard drive, was a great way to ensure that people backed up their Macs. It meant that both desktop Macs and laptops could be automatically backed up without needed to connect an external hard drive. This was not without its quirks, but the technology was seamless. Apple could have extended this backup to iOS devices as well, allowing local backups instead of or in addition to iCloud backups.

I love my Eero setup, but I’d trade it in a heartbeat for an Apple designed and developed mesh Wi-Fi system that allowed Time Capsules, HomePods, and Apple TVs to extend the network.

➝ Source: intego.com

Defaulting to the Share Sheet for Read Later Services Is Lazy ➝

Josh Ginter:

The debut of app extensions effectively eliminated those custom sharing actions to Pocket and Instapaper. Within a few software release cycles, apps like Tweetbot and Reeder opted to shelve development of their own sharing extensions for Pocket or Instapaper and left the sharing mechanism to the system-wide system. […]

In hindsight, this feels like a lazy decision and has hampered the speed and efficiency of saving content to any read-it-later queue.

The share sheet was a massive step forward for iOS, but it shouldn’t have resulted in the removal of these excellent custom sharing features built-in to applications. I’m glad that Unread brought back its custom read later sharing option in its most recent major release. I’d love to see more applications implement it as well.

➝ Source: thenewsprint.co

The True Value of Link Posts ➝

Marius Masalar:

Link posts turn each of your RSS feed sources into their own editorial curation board, offering you glimpses into corners of the internet you may not be exposed to otherwise.

There’s no right or wrong way to do this, and I’m not suggesting that people who share links without commentary are committing some sort of crime against the indie web. However, if you’re going to share new ideas and experiences with someone, it seems courteous to do so with the same care and attention you’d grant them if you were making the recommendation in person.

I’ve published more than my fair share of link posts without any additional commentary, but it’s something I try to avoid as much as I can. It’s much more courteous to add a bit more context about what the link is, why I’m sharing it, and/or any thoughts I have regarding the overall topic.

There are occasions where the blockquote speaks for itself or the commentary is provided within the title, but those are the exception, not the norm.

➝ Source: mariusmasalar.me

Iceberg, a Beautiful Editor for WordPress ➝

I don’t actual write within the WordPress editor on Initial Charge, instead I do all of my writing within Ulysses and then publish to the site using Shortcuts. But if I was to ever move back to writing directly in WordPress, Iceberg is how I’d do it.

I purchased the plugin immediately after seeing it on Twitter, even though I don’t have any plans to actually use it. I want plugins like this to be developed for the platform and want to compensate the developers for investing the time and effort into building it.

Iceberg is a gorgeous, simple editor for WordPress that allows you to write in Markdown. That would be enough for many, but what takes Iceberg to the next level is that it builds upon the block editor instead of replacing it. When you write within Iceberg, all of the markup under the hood is entirely block editor compatible. There’s no need to worry about incompatibilities if you deactivate the plugin down the line — you can gracefully switch back and forth between editors and everything just works.

➝ Source: useiceberg.com

The Streaming Model for Music Doesn’t Work for Artists When They Do Not Earn Live Performance Income ➝

Nick Heer:

There has never been a better time to support musicians directly. The next Bandcamp fee waiver day is June 5, and many artists sell merch and records on the web. You can still buy albums on iTunes, too, in the way your great aunt told you stories about.

I’ve purchased about a half-dozen albums over the past couple of months between physical CDs and iTunes purchases, which is much more than I typically do. If you’re able to support your favorite musicians right now, I would encourage you to do so.

➝ Source: pxlnv.com

Cosmicast 2 ➝

Habib Cham:

Cosmicast, a podcast player released a couple of years ago and recently redesigned from the ground up, is set to disrupt the two-horse race currently led by Overcast and Pocket Casts as the two coveted full-featured third-party podcast players on the App Store by offering on par features, platform access and unique design-centric delights.

I like a lot about what Cosmicast has to offer, especially tvOS and macOS support. If the app allowed for subscribing to password-protected feeds, I would seriously consider switching from Overcast.

➝ Source: chambyte.net

Shortcuts Wishlist ➝

Jordan Merrick:

Shortcuts has gained plenty of features and functionality over the years, especially after Apple’s acquisition of Workflow, but how shortcuts are created and organized has remained almost unchanged since the app first launched back in 2015.

As a result, creating shortcuts like Mocktail is a painstaking and frustrating process. The app simply hasn’t scaled with the increasingly complex uses for shortcuts and the interface is still skewed towards simple shortcuts made up of only a few actions.

After spending what felt like an eternity updating Mocktail, I’ve come up with a wishlist of ten improvements I’d love to see in Shortcuts.

A great list from Jordan here — copying actions, backups/versioning, and the ability to share shortcuts as files are my favorite of the bunch. But I’d add Apple Watch support to the list as well. Specifically the ability to display a shortcut on your Apple Watch Face as a complication, which could be configured per shortcut with a toggle switch next to “Show in Widget” and “Show in Share Sheet”.

➝ Source: jordanmerrick.com

FusionCast, a Podcast to Video Converter ➝

A clever little app from Guilherme Rambo that let’s you quickly create a video from an audio file. It’s designed to allow podcasters to publish their episodes on video publishing platforms. I gave it a try with a random podcast episode from my subscriptions and it is drop-dead simple to use.

I don’t really understand why people listen to audio content on YouTube, but I guess FusionCast could be a powerful tool for podcasters trying to build an audience — letting the algorithm do the work of recommending your episodes to people that might be interested in it based on their viewing habits.

➝ Source: fusioncast.rambo.codes