Linked List Archive

The Initial Charge Linked List is a collection of notable links and brief commentary, with entries regularly added throughout the week.

A Sour Solution ➝

Michael Tsai:

Microsoft got in trouble for bundling their browser with the OS and for preventing resellers from pre-installing competing browsers. They never interfered with other companies making their apps available. Apple doesn’t let resellers pre-install apps and does prevent certain apps (including third-party browser engines) from even being available.

What Apple has done by locking down the platform is far worse than anything Microsoft ever did with Windows.

It hurts users, it hurts developers, and I think it hurts the platform overall. Imagine how much more powerful our pocket computers could be if, for example, the folks at Panic were afforded the freedom necessary to make Transmit and Coda work on iOS.

How many developers gave up on an incredible idea because they knew it would never be approved by Apple, because the business model just wouldn’t work without the ability to sell upgrades, or because it wouldn’t be feasible with Apple taking a 30% cut of the revenue?

➝ Source: mjtsai.com

A Birthday Gift ➝

Matt Mullenweg:

It’s true, it’s true, I turn forty years old in ten days.

What do you get the guy who has everything? […]

Publish a post. About anything! It can be long or short, a photo or a video, maybe a quote or a link to something you found interesting. Don’t sweat it. Just blog. Share something you created, or amplify something you enjoyed. It doesn’t take much. The act of publishing will be a gift for you and me.

What a delightful idea.

➝ Source: ma.tt

Prime Video to Include Ads Next Year, Amazon Offering Ad Free Option for $2.99 a Month ➝

Coincidentally, prior to this news, my wife and I had a conversation about whether we could cancel Amazon Prime. The only feature we actually use is Prime shipping — we don’t use their music service, video service, or anything else, just the shipping.

I have a feeling we could get along fine without it.

As for Prime Video and streaming services in general, the cost-benefit equation has seen a sharp decline in recent years. I’m so glad I made the decision to build my own media library in Plex and eliminate our reliance on these streaming services.

➝ Source: macrumors.com

Don’t Speed Up Your Podcasts ➝

Matt Hauger:

Faster playback gives listeners time for more podcasts—a welcome perk, since the library of available shows continues to grow exponentially. As the market explodes, faster playback seems like a no-brainer: more great conversations, no additional time commitment. What’s not to like?

My advice? Don’t do it. Keep that playback speed locked at 1x. While you’re at it, turn off clever features like Overcast’s “Smart Speed”, which saves time by cropping out silence.

I completely agree with Matt on this. Just listen at 1x without any silence trimming. If you don’t have time to listen to all of your podcasts, consider trimming your subscriptions or skipping episodes that seem less interesting to you.

➝ Source: matthauger.com

Launching as a Progressive Web App ➝

David Heinemeier Hansson:

It’s not a new concept. Google and Microsoft have been trying to push PWAs for years and years, since they both have a strategic interest in the web and avoiding platform lock-in (i.e. dealing with iOS exclusives). But it all remained a bit niche, because the biggest player in native, Apple, wasn’t playing ball.

That finally changed this year. In macOS Sonoma, Safari gained Add to Dock. In iOS and iPadOS 16.4, Safari gained two crucial features: Badge Counting and Web Push Notifications.

The “sweet solution” is actually pretty sweet now. I’m not convinced it will happen because native apps have so much inertia, but I’d love to see apps and services launch as progressive web apps rather than as native apps. If only because you can bypass the gatekeeper and remind everyone how cool the open web can be.

➝ Source: world.hey.com

ActivityPub Has Momentum ➝

I completely agree with Colin Devroe here. ActivityPub is the one protocol that seems to have all the momentum right now. There’s so much pointing to it as the likely future of social networking and I’m glad I jumped into it when I did.

➝ Source: cdevroe.com

iOS 17.2 and tvOS 17.2 Kills TV Show and Movie Wishlists ➝

Juli clover, writing for MacRumors:

In the iTunes Store app on the iPhone and iPad, and the separate iTunes TV Shows and iTunes Movies apps on the ‌Apple TV‌, there were options to add TV shows and movies to a dedicated wishlist when browsing, which consumers used to save the content for later and watch for sales.

The wishlists did not transfer over to the ‌Apple TV‌ app with these updates, so some customers who had compiled long watch lists are unable to access those curated lists or copy them over to a new location. Some users are able to open up the iTunes Store app on iOS devices and tap on the hamburger button in the upper right corner to see their wishlists, but this does not appear to be working for everyone. Those who compiled lists on the ‌Apple TV‌ appear to have no way to access them.

I’ve also noticed that there is no option to view a preview of TV show episodes in the TV app either, which was available in the dedicated iTunes TV Shows app.

A warning on this would have been nice, but I hate that they’re doing it regardless. If I want to browse TV shows or movies to purchase on my Apple TV, all the iTunes Store content is commingled with media that’s only available on streaming. Even if you stick to the “Store” section, you’ll see plenty of movies and shows that require Apple TV+ or another streaming app and subscription to view.

➝ Source: macrumors.com

Messy Desks ➝

Nathan Snelgrove:

My desk is littered with guitar picks, some keys, a stack of receipts, a few USB cables, four notebooks, a couple microfibre cloths (not just for wiping monitors, but also for polishing guitars), coffee cups, a stapler, wire cutters, and a Swiss army knife. 

I should put some of this junk away, but one thing I realized in this conversation is that a messy desk is a productive desk, and a messy office or studio is probably the same.

My office is a bit of a disaster. Especially now that I’m on parental leave. It has become a catch-all for items that we don’t have a place for. And since I’m not working in there regularly, there’s next-to-no incentive to actually keep it tidy.

But even before its current status as a catch-all, my office has always been messy. I suppose I’m generally too busy getting work done to take the time to neaten things up. I used to try and hide it during Zoom calls with a blurred background, but as of late, I usually just let it fly.

➝ Source: nathansnelgrove.com