Linked List Archive

The Initial Charge Linked List is a collection of notable links and brief commentary, with entries regularly added throughout the week.

I Like Apple Mail ➝

Charlotte Rose:

What I’ve realised after using the native Mail app for so long is that actually, what is most important to me is just having all of my email accounts in one place and being able to view all of my inboxes at once via one main inbox.

Same. I’ve tried just about every email app under the sun and always end up coming back to Apple Mail. It gives me a single inbox for all my accounts, performs actions quickly, and just works.

➝ Source: charlotterosewrites.com

Hackers Convinced Twitter Employee to Help Them Hijack Accounts ➝

I’m a bit behind on the Twitter hack story, but Michael Tsai does a great job collecting some of the more interesting takes from around the web.

I’m sure this isn’t a unique thought, but having a single, centralized system for publishing and communication is inherently insecure. It would be wise for high-profile individuals to buy a domain, install some publishing software, and start sharing their thoughts on something they completely control.

If one site gets compromised, it will only effect that single individual. And because they’ll own their own platform, they won’t be beholden to Twitter in regards to what security measures can be put in place.

➝ Source: mjtsai.com

Twitter Announces New API That Opens More Features to Third-Party Apps ➝

Filipe Espósito, writing for 9 to 5 Mac:

Twitter is announcing its new Twitter API v2, which was completely rebuilt with new features. One of the highlights of the new Twitter API is the real-time tweets stream — one of the options removed in the past. Third-party apps can once again load new tweets as they’re published and not just after a period of time.

Other changes to the API include conversation threading, polls, pinned tweets, better spam filter, and advanced search. The Twitter v2 API will be available on three different levels: Standard, Academic Research, and Business.

I hope this will bring about a resurgence in third-party Twitter apps. I think many of the problems on Twitter and the dread that one feels when reading their timeline could be mitigated, if not solved, with just a bit more creative thinking. The type of creative thinking that isn’t limited by the goals and priorities of Twitter itself.

➝ Source: 9to5mac.com

Hey Is Not for Me ➝

Marius Masalar:

In Hey, my email history is always visible, even though I don’t want it to be. I don’t know about you, but once I’ve finished with an email, I don’t want to look at it anymore unless there’s been a reply or I have to refer back to something (via search).

In Gmail, when I open the inbox I see only emails that I need to do something with. In Hey, I see those emails, plus the emails I’ve already dealt with, plus the emails I’ve decided I’ll reply to later, plus the emails I’ve set aside, and sometimes even a button letting me know I have other emails to do something about in the Screener…how exactly is this more tidy and peaceful?

This was my immediate reaction when I gave Hey a try and the primary reason why the service isn’t for me. I want my email client to be enjoyable to use. And that isn’t possible without an archive feature.

I’ll be sticking with my current combination of Fastmail, Gmail, and Apple Mail.

➝ Source: mariusmasalar.me

Mission Ctrl, Block-Powered WordPress Dashboard Customization ➝

From the site:

With mission ctrl you can build your own dashboard widgets with blocks. You know blocks, the things you are already using on your posts/pages to make your WordPress site awesome.

I don’t use blocks on Initial Charge, instead composing everything in Ulysses and the publishing through Shortcuts. The contents of my entries are technical saved in Classic blocks, but I typically only ever interact with them using the code editor.

I do use blocks on other sites I publish, though — a personal site that I manage alongside a few family members and all the sites I interact with at my day job. The block editor is very powerful and letting you use blocks to add custom widgets to the WordPress dashboard is brilliant.

➝ Source: missionctrl.is

Apple Announces iOS 14 ➝

A lot of great improvements in this upgrade including App Library, the ability to save widgets to your home screen, picture-in-picture video, a new Siri user interface, a translation app, pinned threads in Messages, App Clips and more.

➝ Source: apple.com

Why Apple Is Missing the Boat on Home Wi-Fi ➝

Kirk McElhearn, writing for Intego’s mac security weblog:

A mesh wi-fi system could form part of a broader Apple home network. Imagine if the HomePod, Apple TV, or future Apple in-home devices, acted as a satellite for a wi-fi access point, as well as being a HomeKit hub; this could get more people to buy these media devices, knowing that they would serve more than one purpose.

In addition, the Time Capsule, an AirPort base station with a built-in hard drive, was a great way to ensure that people backed up their Macs. It meant that both desktop Macs and laptops could be automatically backed up without needed to connect an external hard drive. This was not without its quirks, but the technology was seamless. Apple could have extended this backup to iOS devices as well, allowing local backups instead of or in addition to iCloud backups.

I love my Eero setup, but I’d trade it in a heartbeat for an Apple designed and developed mesh Wi-Fi system that allowed Time Capsules, HomePods, and Apple TVs to extend the network.

➝ Source: intego.com

Defaulting to the Share Sheet for Read Later Services Is Lazy ➝

Josh Ginter:

The debut of app extensions effectively eliminated those custom sharing actions to Pocket and Instapaper. Within a few software release cycles, apps like Tweetbot and Reeder opted to shelve development of their own sharing extensions for Pocket or Instapaper and left the sharing mechanism to the system-wide system. […]

In hindsight, this feels like a lazy decision and has hampered the speed and efficiency of saving content to any read-it-later queue.

The share sheet was a massive step forward for iOS, but it shouldn’t have resulted in the removal of these excellent custom sharing features built-in to applications. I’m glad that Unread brought back its custom read later sharing option in its most recent major release. I’d love to see more applications implement it as well.

➝ Source: thenewsprint.co